Month: May 2015

Girls lacrosse players reflect on season

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By: Mikayla Grumiaux, Staff Writer

Though the spring season wasn’t everything the players hoped for, our girls varsity lacrosse team still managed to represent James River by bringing home multiple tough wins and embracing each other as a JRHS family. With two wins this season, one against Midlothian and the other against Cosby, these girls have made our school very proud to have them representing JRHS.

Senior Olivia Biaz, has been playing lacrosse for seven years now and is a major asset to the team.

Players usually have that one moment each season that always stays with them. Biaz shared hers and said, “When we beat Cosby 14-12.”

Juliana Vossenberg is a junior on the girls lacrosse team. Unlike many of the other sports here at James River, girls lacrosse does not get the same amount of attention and recognition. Vossenberg shared how she felt about the lack of support shown at their games.

Vossenberg said, “I wish people knew when our games were so that people would actually come.”

For freshmen Mary Hatch, it was her first year playing for James River, and her seventh year playing in total. Although she is one of the younger players, she has already made varsity and scored for them.

Hatch has enjoyed her first year on the team and she said, “I think that it is really fun and I like the people on the team.”

These girls have worked hard and diligently this spring. Some of these players have just begun being apart of this family, and for many others it is their last year playing for James River. They have all added so much spirit to our school throughout this season by being a part of the James River High School girls lacrosse team.

 

A Night of Stars

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By: Melissa Rau, Staff Writer

Many James River High upperclassman girls might agree that the most stressful yet magical event of the school year is the evening that occurs every May: prom.

This year, our school’s prom took place on Saturday, May 16th at the Greater Richmond Convention Center from 7-11 pm. The dance was themed “Galaxy- A Night of Stars,” and featured a large ballroom decorated with lights, stars, and balloons.

Music for the evening was provided by the Mid Atlantic Professional DJ Association. Also provided for the guests were refreshments, including punch, cookies, and a candy bar. A photo booth was available for attendees to use, in addition to a photographer roaming around the dance and snapping candid shots.

After seniors participated in nomination and voting processes in weeks prior, seniors Benjamin Caracciolo and Camryn Fitzgerald were crowned as this year’s Prom King and Queen.

This night would not have been a success without the efforts of Mr. Joyner, Mr. Ellick, the administrative staff, faculty, and Junior Class Council. Check out some photos below!

A group of James River students are all smiles before heading to prom. Photo By: Lisa Fairfield
A group of James River students are all smiles before heading to prom.
Photo By: Lisa Fairfield
These seniors pose outside soon before making their way to the Richmond Convention Center. Photo By: Chris Behrens
These seniors pose outside soon before making their way to the Richmond Convention Center.
Photo By: Chris Behrens
Some juniors are ready in their ties and dresses for a night of stars. Photo By: Kerri Dryden
Some juniors are ready in their ties and dresses for a night of stars.
Photo By: Kerri Dryden

James River holds annual Color Run

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By Summer Mikalson, Staff Writer

James River’s Parent Teacher Association hosted the annual Color Splash run on Saturday, April 25. Starting at 10:00 A.M. on the James River track, hundreds of students, parents, teachers, and faculty raced towards the finish line. During the run, volunteers threw paints of various colors at the runners and, for the first time ever, glitter was thrown as well.

Many of James River’s freshmen and sophomores participated in the color splash run to be exempt from their final gym exam. More pictures can also be found on the bulletin board near the front office. Check out our photo gallery below!

Students pose with color powder and glitter after the race. Photo by Ashley Purisima
Students pose with color powder and glitter after the race.
Photo by Ashley Purisima
Students race to the finish line as they’re showered with color. Photo by Ashley Purisima
Students race to the finish line as they’re showered with color.
Photo by Ashley Purisima
Students relax on a sea of color after the race. Photo by Zoey Boyd
Students relax on a sea of color after the race.
Photo by Zoey Boyd
Student flashes a colorful smile Photo by Zoey Boyd
Student flashes a colorful smile
Photo by Zoey Boyd
Face reflects the colors of the race Photo by Zoey Boyd
Face reflects the colors of the race
Photo by Zoey Boyd

OP-ED: School fails to celebrate Women’s History Month

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By: Carly Lester, Staff Writer

The fight for women’s rights in the United States is tough, and it’s not over yet. To recognize women’s struggle for equality and to celebrate their achievements, March is Women’s History Month. Since 1987, the President of the United States makes an annual proclamation formally designating March as Women’s History Month, and encourages Americans to observe and honor women’s accomplishments. The observation of these accomplishments, however, does not happen often.

Women’s History Month never seemed to become common knowledge, and even people who identify themselves as feminists were left in the dark. Special recognition for groups of people who have had to work for equality and representation are essential. If the month that the American people are called on to honor the female gender for their hard work and commitment to their families, friends, and country is overlooked, then something is wrong.

It is easy to see this in the disappointing lack of awareness in James River High School. As stated by Junior Lila Bryce, the founder of the Feminist Club, “You can do such tiny things to have a big effect,” which can really apply to this situation. Perhaps the Feminist Club might have taken more initiative and planned something for March, but Bryce herself didn’t even know that it was Women’s History Month.

And that is the root of our problem: the complete dismissal of Women’s History Month, making it seemingly nonexistent.  “A lot of people are scared of change, so they don’t want it to change from the patriarchal environment to a more equal environment,” Bryce said. Perhaps this is one of the reasons that Women’s History Month is not advertised as much as it should be. It is possible that men see this special month designated to the history of women as a threat to the social structure that already exists. Some people may even think that the Women’s Rights movement is over and there is no need for a special month. However, this is not true for many women are still dealing with oppression due to issues like the double standard between men and women, the wage gap, and body control.

Some institutions recognized Women’s History Month, like many museums in Washington D.C. and New York. They displayed exhibits dedicated to the accomplishments of women in the National Portrait Gallery, National Museum of American History, the Library of Congress, etc. Even then, the celebration in schools was sparse.

So, what is the solution to this problem? We can all start on a smaller scale when addressing the lack of participation and recognition of Women’s History Month and spread the word within the school. Hopefully next year, the Feminist Club will bring this month to the attention of the school, and anything they can do to celebrate, no matter how small that effort might be, it will definitely be appreciated.     

Seniors flood the River: Senior Takeover Day

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By: Meg Carroll, Staff Writer

On May 1st, at the end of Senior Spirit Week, more than 80 seniors participated in Senior takeover day. The senior class officers voiced their reflections and explained the entirety of the event.

“Seniors get to choose a teacher that they’ve had in the past or just admire, and work with them too–exactly like it sounds like–take over the class and do a fun lesson,” senior Jennifer Foliaco said.

Students were not limited to just working in the classroom. If seniors wanted, they could be incorporated into the routine of custodians, lunch ladies, and security officers. One senior, Benjamin Caracciolo, had the opportunity to do so.

“I took over the security officers…they’re more than just teachers at the school that have responsibilities, so it was really cool to walk around and see what someone else does at the school that isn’t just a teacher, but kind of a part of the administrative team and behind-the-scenes security,” Caracciolo said.

Although some seniors chose to take the “behind the scenes” route and view the school from a new perspective, most seniors decided to take part in the classroom. Senior Kathryn Thompson explained what seniors are allowed to do in classes.

“So depending on the teacher that you’re working with, sometimes you can do a fun different lesson plan, or go outside, or do a class game, or sometimes the teacher will make you actually try to teach one of the lessons that they’re working on; so it just depends on the teacher and what the difficulty of the class is and what they’re learning at that time,” Thompson said.

With SOLs, AP tests and final exams on the way, many seniors were able to try teaching since teachers wanted to stay on a course related to the lesson plan. Others were able to help teachers grade or simply enjoy spending time with peers.

“We talked about what they were learning about and we helped grade these paper things because they had mini quizzes and then we just played games with them, and I made cookies!” senior Kelli Rieck said.

Although classes were taught by seniors, the lessons were valuable since older students were able to convey their knowledge and give helpful advice to peers. The day was enjoyable for all. Foliaco points out, “it’s just kinda cool because you’ve spent four years being a student and then for this one day you get to be a teacher.”